Edexcel A Level History Coursework Part A

 
  1. Hi
    I've just done the first draft of my coursework where you have to find your own sources and use your own knowledge to construct an argument.

    I am doing:
    Did the equal rights legislation passed in 1964 make a difference to the lives of Black Americans in the period 1964-98?
    I am just unsure as to how to use the sources; Do you use them as a set like AS sources unit or differently??

    I've integrated my own knowledge in with the sources but haven't used them explicitly as a set. Is that right or wrong??

    If anyone could help me that would be great

    Thanks

  2. I'm not sure what you mean by using them as a set, but I'm doing a very similar bit of work, so hopefully what I say can help. You have to analyse the sources and integrate your own knowledge , which it sounds like you have done. As well as this you should compare some of the sources like you would do on the exam, but obviously only some if the sources will be relevant to each other, so only do it when they are.

    This is only what I did in mine, and since I handed my first craft in less than an hour ago, it's entirely possible that I'm wrong about how to approach it an just haven't found out yet. Maybe check the AOs and ask your teacher etc, just to make sure I'm not stalk ng rubbish!

    Posted from TSR Mobile

  3. I've done the A2 Edexcel coursework because I was entered for January. I ended up with full marks, 80/80 which I am really chuffed about! We did something different though, the topic was Britain's Empire and its African colonies and we chose our own questions and sources.

    With the sources question it's a bit different to AS in the sense that not much of your own knowledge is actually needed and they care less about it. Definitely do include your own knowledge to support your argument and state facts where relevant as it demonstrates that you know what you're talking about. So I'd say what you're doing at the moment is correct, just don't overdo it.

    What they're mainly looking for though, is how you can take a source and really pick it apart by analyzing it in great depth. For example comparing it to other sources to add weight to your argument is a really good way to do this. Also really look at who is talking, where they were at the time of the event and why they'd be saying what they are saying and in what manner. For example I found peoples' jobs were useful as it can explain the way they saw and talked about the event.

    Evaluation of the sources is also key to this question so make sure your essay is balanced but also has a strong argument leaning either way. I was told for a high grade it's important that your own voice and opinion comes through to show that you've really engaged with what you've been asked and you fully understand it.

    (Original post by Holly Berry)
    Hi
    I've just done the first draft of my coursework where you have to find your own sources and use your own knowledge to construct an argument.

    I am doing:
    Did the equal rights legislation passed in 1964 make a difference to the lives of Black Americans in the period 1964-98?
    I am just unsure as to how to use the sources; Do you use them as a set like AS sources unit or differently??

    I've integrated my own knowledge in with the sources but haven't used them explicitly as a set. Is that right or wrong??

    If anyone could help me that would be great

    Thanks

Paper 1: Option 1D: Britain, c1785–c1870: democracy, protest and reform

  • The growth of parliamentary democracy, c1785–c1870
  • Industrialisation and protest, c1785–c1870
  • Unionism and cooperation, c1785–c1870
  • Poverty and pauperism, c1785–c1870
  • What explains the abolition of the slave trade at the end of the period, c1785–1807?

60 marks
2 hours and 15 minutes – written paper
30% of A Level

Paper 2:  Option 2D.2: The unification of Germany, c1840–71

  • Popular pressure and causes of revolution, 1840–48
  • Failure of revolution, 1848–51
  • Austro-Prussian rivalry, 1852–66
  • Prussia and the Kleindeutschland solution, 1866–71

40 marks
2 hours and 30 minutes – written paper
20% of A Level

Paper 3:  Option 3D9: Civil rights and race relations in the USA, 1850–2009

  • The changing geography of civil rights issues
  • Changing portrayal of civil rights
  • ‘Free at last’, 1865-77
  • The triumph of ‘Jim Crow’ 1883-c 1900
  • The new deal and race relations. 1933-41
  • ‘I have a dream’, 1954-68
  • Obama’s campaign for the presidency

60 marks
2 hours 15 minutes – written exam
30% of A level

Non-Exam Assessment: History Coursework

  • Students complete a single assignment on a question set by the centre.
  • The assignment will assess the ability to carry out a historical enquiry, analysing and evaluating historical interpretations, and organising and communicating the findings

40 marks
Non exam assessment
20% of A level

It is your responsibility to find an exam centre and we recommend you book your exams 6 months prior to the date of exams (exams are not included in the course fees).

0 thoughts on “Edexcel A Level History Coursework Part A

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *